October 4, 2019

SEPTEMBER 2019 SHORTLIST

Don’t Let Go – How Are You Dealing With Grief?

Ewan Black, 26

 

After I lost my father I struggled with a constructive way to channel my grief. As a man, pressure to remain strong pushed my feelings towards anger, which I was constantly suppressing. According to MentalHealth.org.uk, 72% of men in the UK experienced two or more mental health problems, but only 9% were reported to receive medical help in 2017.

This film was a way of getting perspective on my events and gave me a physical way to show how I felt, which was easier than telling. It expresses literal, metaphorical, and abstract thoughts I found too complicated to discuss…
View Ewan’s full entry.

HOW DO WE CONNECT TO OUR TEENAGERS WHEN THEY BECOME CONSUMED BY THE DIGITAL AGE?

Lorna Somerville, 46

 

This is an oil painting of my son watching TV. He no longer appears aware of me and the image on his t-shirt is the only one which appears to be paying attention… I suppose this is me as a parent acknowledging that this is now part of his world and one I need to learn to embrace.

When you watch a child grow through childhood, I think there are moments when you experience conflicted emotions. You are happy that they are growing up healthy and inquisitive. At the same time…

View Lorna’s full entry.

IS THERE LIFE BEYOND PATRIARCHY?

Julie Barker, 53

 

This reflection on three generations of men explores how patriarchy operates as a continuum. It begins as a benign force which is largely positive and then descends into malignancy and culminates as a chaotic, violent mess. Told from a female perspective which aims to recollect and understand rather than judge the intention of this essay is to get beneath the skin of why men become violent. It also asks how we as a human collective can redefine what it means to be a ‘real man.’

View Julie’s full entry.

IS MY BROKEN FINGER THE SAME AS YOUR BROKEN LEG?

Natalie Arle-Toyne, 39

 

The piece of land onto which we are born determines our opportunity.

I grew up in Durban, South Africa, during the last of the Apartheid years. When I was nine, a gogo (Zulu for grandmother) and her heavily pregnant daughter showed up at our door and a baby boy was born on my lounge floor.

I was brought up with the adage “my broken finger is the same as your broken leg” – all pain is equal and valid when contextualised…

View Natalie’s full entry.

CAN WE FIND INSPIRATION THROUGH NATURE TO MAKE THE CHANGES NEEDED FROM A POSITIVE PERSPECTIVE?

Fiona McAndrew, 38

 

Waders lullaby is an animation about wading, migrating birds which are currently endangered. The research was focused on black tail godwits and their passing through the Firth of Forth. Although some of the dangers that are bringing their numbers down are subtly represented, their fragility is contrasted by their resilience in their migrations, which are still full of wonder and mystery to us.

View Fiona’s full entry.

SHOULD WE TAKE A LEAF OUT OF THEIR BOOK?

Lorna Romanenghi, 24

 

“Above and Below” is inspired by the way plants communicate and interact.

Creating strong communication networks both above and below ground, plants interact with different organisms, as well as each other, ensuring the survival and prosperity of every member of these networks.
This is possible through intricate root-system communications facilitated by fungi, which allow neighbouring plants to transfer information through their roots…

View Lorna’s full entry.

HOW CAN ART LIFT UNHELPFUL STIGMAS ASSOCIATED WITH UNEMPLOYMENT?

Christian Masters, 28

 

It’s a strange tragedy that the subject of unemployment is so under-represented in the arts.

The same colorful feelings that have inspired an overflow of love songs are just as real for the unemployee. The loneliness, the idealizing, the fear of rejection, the heartbreak, the moving on, the first date—all part of searching for a ‘good job’.

I began this project to bring some comic relief to my own soul wrenching experience of job searching…

View Christian’s full entry.

HOW CAN WE GIVE WASTE MATERIAL A SECOND CHANCE AND TRANSFORM IT INTO A PRECIOUS ARTEFACT THAT TELLS A STORY?

Juli Bolaños-Durman, 34

 

Bolaños-Durman is known for facilitating the transformation of waste material and reimagining perspectives with hope. Her practice is driven by a genuine concern for the amount of rubbish we produce as consumers. So as a maker that works with a material that can be fixed through various heritage cold-working processes, it is a brilliant opportunity for the work to become a symbol of renewal. In the end, these objets d’art personify a story of potential with a bit of sass/ humour and become beacons for social change…

View Juli’s full entry.