September 16, 2019

Is the nature of queerness inherently both beautiful and grotesque?

Dylan Moore, 28

‘Closet Monsters’ manifests the historical relationship between the grotesque and queer ‘otherness’ as a portraiture series of imagined characters. The monstrous connotation of queerness – and the metaphorical ‘closet’ within which it resides – is considered here as a fundamental aspect of queer culture; a shared emotional and spiritual space within which we have been able to imagine and construct identities intended to challenge the monopolization of beauty and tastefulness by cis-hetero society. Subversive in nature, there is an aspect of queer culture that may never – and does not want to – be accepted by wider society, despite queer visibility being at an all-time high; our love for the abnormal cannot exist without the counter-point of normality. Will our culture ever be fully integrated with that of the mainstream, and do we want it to? ‘Closet Monsters’ explores this duality – the desire to be loved by and yet separate from cis-hetero society – and asks if the nature of queerness is inherently both beautiful and grotesque.

Closet Monsters, 2019Altered Digital Photographic Print33cmx48cm