August 30, 2020

Is it better to be honest or comforting?

Hannah McGregor, 20

When traditional Scottish culture is unwittingly at ends with celebrating queer identity, being able to balance these two things as a Scottish queer person can prove difficult. This opens the floor for Jamie, a young queer person just starting out in their identity, to try and communicate with their mother through one voice message. Young queer people often do not face the more extreme and obvious homophobia that previous generations experienced in the UK, but a more subtle and nuanced behaviour which is often overlooked in non-queer spaces. Used as punchlines for jokes, side-eyed smirks, and disregarding hand gestures, queerness in Scotland is under a new kind of pervasive scrutiny from those that may not even be aware of it. By showing one person’s struggle to decide whether to tell the truth and face exclusion, or lie to avoid any possible fallout, we can see how anti-queer discourse in Scottish culture affects the most vulnerable stage in a young person’s development: the creation of their own identity.

Please Leave a Message, Monologue