What happens at the vanishing point of an absence?

What happens at the vanishing point of an absence?

Rebecca Gill, 21

And I, Animal Format is a slippery, idiosyncratic film, investigating the tricksy nature of moving image as a compositional format for dealing with collective inherited narratives of belief, and the editing process as a rupture to these narratives. Layers of reality bleed and share space, memories are adopted and displaced, sites overlapping like the sound, in an embodiment of the alchemical, nomadic structure of a cognitive process.

The film draws on the conceit of visibility to address the act of looking, of being looked at, the materiality and iconoclasm of Cinema and the promise of partial perspectives as a way forward. It does so from a responsive perspective, examining religious narratives and the devotional anticipation of belief, as they operate in the domestic sphere, decontextualised from ecclesiastical space. These narratives must be examined for their potential for violence, homogenisation of perspectives, erasure. Ultimately, formal elements of the film, which slips anachronistically between analogue and digital, provide the literal rupture to the sequence, breaking down and coming back to itself.

The John Byrne Award