September 12, 2019

AUGUST 2019 SHORTLIST

HOW TO BE A WOMAN IN THE 21ST CENTURY?

Melissa Mitchell, 22

 

‘Dear Mum’ encourages women to open up conversations about the universal trials and tribulations of the female experience, whether that be the agonies of motherhood or the constant pressure to be young and beautiful in a society obsessed with image. It also challenges society’s increasingly unrealistic expectations of women and their bodies by subverting the conventional female nude.

View Melissa’s full entry.

SOLITUDE OR LONELINESS?

Riky Christian, 26

 

This piece is a comic that explores a particular societal issue of how people are somehow forced to live in a certain way to fit in with the majority of society. People are expected to be social all the time and express themselves by talking or communicating frequently, otherwise they will regarded as antisocial or as a “weirdo”. Some people, mostly known as people who are more introverted, prefer to live in a more reserved way and do not need to socialise all the time. This expectation to socialise all the time, to talk and to always be in company with someone else creates an anxiety that can damage their well being. Introverted people prefer to have a calm environment and cannot stand being watched all the time. Which also becomes a trigger for their social anxiety and their longing for solitude…

View Riky’s full entry.

DOES PRETTY EQUAL PAIN?

Keri Hannah, 25

 

‘Pretty Hurts’ is a constructed photo series that follows the character Stacey through her everyday rituals, and seeks to explore society’s obsession with beauty, consumerism and outward appearances. Stacey is a caricature of the several facets concerned with body image expectations, and the stereotypes placed upon women; she is impressionable, pressured and anxiety ridden. Largely inspired by housewife handbooks from the 1960’s, ‘Pretty Hurts’ is styled in a way that is relatable, yet not instantly recognisable – it is styled as an amalgamation of eras which is intended to prompt the question…

View Keri’s full entry.

SHOULD KINDNESS EXTEND TO ALL CONSCIOUS CREATURES?

Isa Rao, 29

 

Crannog explores the fragility and strength that comes from caring for others when they are sick or close to dying and the film poses the very universal question if kindness should extend to all conscious creatures.

As a cognitive neuroscientist I have always been interested in animal consciousness and to me, it seemed obvious that both humans and most animals can feel joy, excitement and fear. And despite this, we still do not give animals the same consideration as humans, in particular in death and sickness…

View Isa’s full entry.

IS LONG TERM COMMITMENT HEALTHY FOR A YOUNG PERSON?

Thomas Crowe, 20

 

‘Waiting For Her’ explores a long distance relationship between two lovers. My work invites the viewer to interact with the piece by waiting in a queue to reunite the lovers. Queuing lasts for about 10 minutes and the player must move forwards every few seconds to keep up. The player can choose at any time to step out of the queue and end the game.

Technology has become so intertwined in our lives that the concept of digital love feels completely normal. It has opened so many possibilities for communication…

View Thomas’ full entry.

WHY DOES LONELINESS IN A SOCIAL SETTING OFTEN GO UNNOTICED?

Ryan Langfield, 18

 

My entry explores the alienation that stems from social deprivation and inner-conflict. The pressing need to be unseen in a crowd full of vibrancy. The need to disappear in a place filled with people.

I explore the devastating impact of ones anxiety as well as ones loneliness – loneliness which is generally unrecognised due to the fact that it isn’t as simple as disassociating from people physically and staying in your room. It is a loneliness that has your physical whole there and ever-present, but your mind and mentality elsewhere…

View Ryan’s full entry.

WHAT IS IDENTITY?

Tun de Jong, 27

 

My entry explores the concept of identity against the backdrop of a resurgence of nationalism and identity politics, drawing from my experience with these issues as a Luxembourger and building a bridge between communal identity and individual identity: rooted perhaps, but open still. As our possibilities for the development of our personal and professional lives become ever more abundant and the world becomes smaller, the question of identity becomes a prominent one, deserving of reflection that draws from different perspectives. In a world where clear categories are slowly turning from being the norm to the exception and where, therefore, the appetite for clarity is bigger than ever…

I AGREE, WE AGREE, BUT DO THEY?

Callum Boath, 29

 

Where words leave off, music begins.

I sit with friends and we speak of the impending doom evoked by climate change. I agree, they agree, we all agree. We look at the news. It appears that many still don’t agree.

It seems that rhetoric has reached a point of inertia and everyone has stopped. At our level of discussions, admittedly a lower level, we are in accord. We sign petitions, we attend the rallies, we recycle… But then it stops.

Where words leave off, music begins…

View Callum’s full entry.

DOES LACK OF OPPORTUNITY LEAD TO DESTRUCTION?

 

CAN YOU FIND LOVE ONLINE?

Mondo Love, 18

 

My entry explores how social media has effected how my generation forms relationships.

With the advent of things like tinder we’re becoming ever more detached from meeting people in real life. Most people I know wouldn’t talk to a stranger at all. It’s as if every meeting of two people has to have been planned, if that were the case, imagine how different the history books would be.

View Mondo’s full entry.

IS THE BODY SILENT?

Harry Brooks, 21

 

There is a language of movement and gesture which is capable of communicating the emotional state of person in a profound and deeply moving way. Improvised choreography explores an ability to create an authentic way of moving. By isolating specific movements and found gestures or unconscious movements and exploring them through film, the viewer is able to engage in a close-up, personal interaction with the performer. This observation of unconscious body movements combined with shifts in mood and sensation explored in the film, slowly expose deeper more visceral feelings behind the performance.

View Harry’s full entry.